Metabolic Primer Part 1 of 3 If You Can Measure It, You Can Manage It

By Pat Jak, BS, CPT, USAC II, USAC Power Based Training Coach

Tell me if this is you: you get frustrated when you hit a plateau?  Do you feel like you are working as hard as possible and yet don’t see any changes. This is often when I hear the following phrases:

  • My metabolism is out of control.
  • My metabolism makes my body want certain foods.
  • I’m getting old so my metabolism is slowing down.
  • I downloaded this app that tells me my metabolic rate.
  • Today I plan on getting a great metabolic workout.

Unfortunately, these phrases are a little misguided and further perpetuated thanks to news articles, morning talk shows, and other media blitzes that hit us daily. To make matters worse, we are told things like “If you’re trying to lose weight, don’t weigh yourself too often.” Or we are told, “good diets are effortless and we don’t have to count calories.” Um, excuse me but if I never weigh myself how do I know if I’ve lost weight? Also, if I’m not measuring how much I’m eating, how do I know I am sticking to my plan?

Diet and exercise changes require a high level of managing because you are trying to force change. And the best way to manage a process is to regularly measure progress. While I understand what people mean when they throw out these phrases, there are better ways we can empower ourselves and make positive changes to our health and fitness. And it comes from understanding a few key things about metabolism and measuring it to manage it.

Try not to get hung up in those over used phrases mentioned earlier because:

  • Metabolism is trainable. It CAN be changed. With exercise, healthy diet, and good lifestyle habits, you can maximize your metabolism!
  • Your metabolism doesn’t want certain foods. It just wants real, quality food. So FEED IT!
  • Metabolism does NOT slow down when we age. In reality, there is only a 2% loss every decade. We simply move LESS when we age. Move more and your metabolism increases no matter how old you are!
  • There is NOT an app for that! When you calculate your metabolic rate estimated by your age, height, weight, and gender, you can have a 1,000-calorie margin of error!
  • ALL workouts are metabolic! When you workout, you impact your metabolism.

Okay, I’ll spare you the detailed exercise physiology, but I do want to share a few key points to help shed some light on the confusion we face with our own metabolisms and how to overcome them to help build a leaner, healthier, happier you.

What is Metabolism?

Our metabolism is a collection of biochemical processes that combine nutrients with oxygen to release energy. This release of energy helps us grow, reproduce, maintain basic life processes, and respond to our environment. Metabolism is as individual as a fingerprint and is based on genetics, lifestyle, training, and nutrition.

Our metabolism will change. This is important because we use our fuel (food) differently when we are exercising and when we are at rest. Normally measured in calories, food and metabolism is simply a measurement of energy. In other words, some foods provide more energy than others and some activities burn more energy than others do. This does NOT mean you can eat whatever you want as long as “calories in” balance “calories out.” It also means you CANNOT exercise however you want and burn calories equally. Quality and type of food matters. Likewise, quality and type of workout is important to consider.

Is This What They Mean By Metabolic Rate?

Absolutely! And you actually have two basic metabolic rates that are most meaningful to your health and fitness goals, your Resting Metabolic Rate and your Active Metabolic Rate.

Your Resting Metabolic Rate

This is the amount of calories you use on a daily basis to maintain basic life functions including brain activity, liver function, lung function, and tissue growth and repair. It actually represents 60-75% of your total daily energy expenditure. The basics do apply. Eat more than your daily requirement and your body will store energy (gain weight). Eat below your daily requirement and your body will reduce it’s energy stores (lose weight).

It is important to note that if you are too aggressive with your daily calculations and fall below the very base resting metabolic number, you will negatively impact your body. This often occurs with crash diets, starvation diets, and insane Hollywood cleanses. But it can also occur when we “get too busy to eat,” skip meals, or only eat tiny portions.

Why should too little food matter? Remember that your resting metabolism is responsible for brain activity, lung function, and liver function. If you don’t feed these organs and allow them to do their thing, you will create catastrophic effects in your body and actually increase the aging process and risk for debilitating disease.

Your Active Metabolic Rate

This is your capacity for work during activities such as exercise. It can be shown through a correlation of three key markers. Among these are your AEROBIC Threshold. Representing the point when you utilize fat as a primary fuel source, Aerobic Threshold is the number you find on a new car’s sticker that shows best MPG.

Another marker is your ANAEROBIC Threshold, which is the point when you lose the ability to utilize oxygen and fat to create energy. Another way to look at it is your “redline.” You will be able to rev your engine at this level of intensity, but probably not for very long.

Finally, the number everyone likes to use to compare ability is your VO2max. While high-level athletes often rely on VO2max to determine competition readiness, it is important to everyone because it represents potential.

How Do I Know What My Metabolic Numbers Are?

There is only one true way. Get tested. If we are all individuals and our metabolisms reflect our individual characteristics and activities, wouldn’t you want to know your numbers? If simple little calculators can be off by 1,000 calories, wouldn’t you want to know your EXACT numbers?

Everyone has a benefit if they are tested regularly.

  • You can establish a baseline or snapshot of you right now.
  • You can identify your individual needs and what you want to achieve.
  • You can create a customized, periodized training plan to be better able to achieve your goals.
  • You can track progress and see how your metabolism changes over time.

A Case Study

Just to give an idea how important it is to test your metabolism, consider the following data from my own test taken last month.

  • Resting Metabolic Rate was ESTIMATED anywhere from 2,730-3,037 calories per day while the ACTUAL was 2,574.
  • VO2max was ESTIMATED at 36.6 mL/kg/min, while the ACTUAL was 67.5.
  • Threshold heart rate was ESTIMATED at 155 beats per minute while the ACTUAL was 160.

Why does this difference matter? If I had relied upon calculators to estimate the numbers that are most meaningful in my exercise and daily calorie intake, I would be spinning my wheels. The estimated versus actual numbers leads to a half-pound to a full pound difference per week. In 12-weeks of training, this is a 6-12 pound difference under or over my goal!

The exercise estimations lead to incorrect training levels and false estimations on how many calories I burn at different levels of intensities. In the same 12-weeks of training, this can lead to a difference of another 2 to 3 pounds. Why would I want to estimate and take the chance of gaining 8-14 pounds in 12 weeks?

Measuring versus estimation is ALWAYS more accurate. And when it comes to your metabolism, never assume. Never estimate. If you want to get on top of your health, fitness, and nutrition, know your numbers. And the best way to know your numbers is to test them. Because if you can measure it, you can manage it!

This is a three part series all about metabolism, how to test it, how to train it, and how to fuel it. Come back next time for Metabolic Primer 2: Using Cardio Training to Effectively Boost Your Metabolism Or…

What You Thought You Knew About Cardio Was Probably Wrong

About Pat Jak

For nearly a decade, Pat Jak has worked with performance athletes, teams, and fitness conscious individuals from all walks of life. With one-on-one consultation and customized training plans, he coaches and trains cyclists, multi-sport, and endurance athletes including beginners, juniors, seniors, and masters, several of whom are World, National and State champions and medallists. His workouts have been featured in Bicycling Magazine and he is currently Director of Metabolic Testing at Fitness Quest 10, Team Coach for the Swami’s Pro Development Team, Head Coach of the UCSD Cycling Team, and Coach for the Challenged Athletes Foundation Million Dollar Challenge.

To learn more, or to schedule your metabolic test, contact Fitness Quest 10.

Learning From Our Kids

The primary difference between training adults and youth is that training youth is all about giving them something physically constructive to do with “all that energy.”  For adults, it’s all about giving them some energy by giving them something physically constructive to do.

Youth are little fireballs of energy.  Adults are constantly looking for ways to get energy.  Imagine that if at 40, you had the energy you did when you were 10!  While there are certain neural and physiological factors that create a difference, let’s look at some practical behavioral differences that could help explain the contrast between energy levels in adults and youth.

Kids Sleep:  Young kids go to bed at the same time every night, usually close to when the sun goes   down.  They have a pre bedtime ritual (brush teeth, get in pajamas, read stories, say prayers, other “calm down” activities.)  Adults often go to bed at different times every night with no clear pre-bedtime process of calming down.  Kids don’t go to the playground complaining about the crappy night of sleep they just had.  Poor sleep patterns have been linked to a host of health problems.  Develop a pre- bedtime routine to supercharge your sleep.

Kids Laugh and Giggle:  Kids are always looking for an excuse to laugh or giggle.  When’s the last time you had a real belly-laugh?  When was the last time you got the giggles?  As adults, we have to search for these opportunities to be silly.  There is quite a bit of research on laughing and health.

Kids Move:  It can be somewhat of a “chicken or the egg” phenomenon, but kids are constantly moving.  Some argue it’s because “kids have more energy.”  That is true to a certain degree.  However, creating energy in our bodies is like a perpetual motion machine.  When we move, we create energy.  When we have energy, we want to move.  Our body depends on circulation to create and distribute materials to our cells to create energy.  No movement, no energy.

Kids Don’t Force Toxins Into Their System:  Your car stops running well if you use bad oil, fuel, or other low-grade or downright damaging materials for operation.  Your body works the same way.  While kids can develop poor nutrition habits (facilitated by adults), the amount of downright toxic substances they directly ingest is normally 0.  I’m talking about alcohol, drugs (legal and illegal), smoking, excessive caffeine, and other “adult” vices.  As adults, we know these are not good for our system, but we take them in anyway.  If something isn’t good for your vehicle and you put it in the gas tank anyway, what happens to the car?

Kids Play:  When was the last time you performed a physical activity without an essential, directed outcome?  “Play” is physical creativity.  It helps our body and mind develop the way they should.  Unfortunately, even the amount of play our youth participate in is now limited.  When you watch kids play, what do you see?  Probably a mix of movement, social interaction, and probably some laughing to boot!  Find some play outlets as an adult.  That may mean playing with your kids, joining a sports league, or merely shooting hoops by yourself.

The list could go on.  The point is that as children, we naturally separate ourselves from the things that damage our mind, body, and soul.  As adults we are almost forced to have an affinity for them.  This affects many things, including our daily energy!  I have a saying, “If you want to feel like your 20, act like you’re 7”.   Sleep, move, laugh, and play!

 Brett Klika C.S.C.S. Director of Athletics at Fitness Quest 10, is a world renowned human performance specialist, motivational speaker, author, and educator. In his 14 year career, Brett has accrued more than 20,000 hours of training with youth, athletes, executives, and every day people.  He uses this knowledge and experience to motivate individuals and audiences around the world through his writing, speaking, DVD’s, an d personal correspondence.

Who’s On Your Team?

By: Dr. Jenifer Reiner

Who’s on your team?

Athletes whether they are professional football players or collegiate volleyball players are surrounded by a team of medical providers, team coaches, and strength and conditioning staff all focused on providing a comprehensive program to achieve optimal health and performance.  Outside these settings, however, a coordinated effort between one’s medical doctor, personal trainer, chiropractor, or physical therapist is more of a dream rather than a reality.  Clients are becoming more aware of this “team” approach and are seeking out the one-stop-shop for their training and rehabilitation needs.

Following chiropractic school I was fortunate to experience the “team” approach to rehabilitation while working in the athletic department at the University of California San Diego.   The road to recovery is a collective effort that includes medical doctors, physical therapists, athletic trainers, acupuncturists, strength coaches, and chiropractors.  While many of our skills overlapped, the combined efforts in diagnosis, treatment, and sport specific training provided appropriate checks and balances to ensure we were on the right track for success.  Outside the university setting, however, I worked in a private practice that included two other chiropractors.  Challenging cases with atypical presentations or limitations in my own treatment skills often left me frustrated due to a lack of resources.  It was time to make a change in my personal practice and recreate the university setting I had grown to love.  Around that time, Todd Durkin was in search of a sports-based chiropractor to complete his team of rehabilitation and training staff at Fitness Quest 10.  The opportunity included a team of physical therapists (Water and Sports Physical Therapy), massage therapists, a world class group of strength and conditioning coaches, Pilates instructors, and yoga teachers.  Christmas had come early.

After 2 short years since joining the “team,” it’s safe to say I have experienced the most growth professionally, educationally, and personally, than in college and post graduate work combined.  I believe the key to this success lies in the motivation of those around you, your “teammates” dedication to mastering their craft, and pure enjoyment of learning from those constantly seeking the best information available.  No one settles for mediocrity in this establishment and failure is not an option.

I write this in hopes of encouraging other industry professionals to put aside the egos, if you haven’t already done so, and seek out your “team.”  Finding a core group of individuals with varied backgrounds, who speak the same language, and work together to improve your client’s/patient’s health and physical performance, is unprecedented.  Maybe I speak for myself, but this profession is not about us.  It’s not about how much money you make, how smart you are, how great your skills are, or how many people follow you on Twitter.  We are a profession of service and I would venture to say that 99% of us feel the most satisfied when we meet our client’s goals and exceed their expectations.  Therefore, whether you are a chiropractor, physical therapist, medical doctor, strength coach, sports coach, message therapist, etc., a team of masterminds is critical to your personal and professional success.  Research your local professionals, connect with like-minded individuals in the industry, combine services under one roof, and pick the brains of your teammates.  In the words of Martin Rooney, “Success and mediocrity are both contagious.  If you want to be great, surround yourself with great people and get infected.” Most importantly, your clients will appreciate your “team” effort in their quest for health and wellness.

Dr. Jennifer Reiner is the chiropractor for Water and Sports Physical Therapy and Fitness Quest 10 in San Diego, California.  She obtained a Bachelor’s of Science Degree in Exercise Science from the University of Florida and went on to pursue a Doctor of Chiropractic degree from Palmer College of Chiropractic West.  As a member of the Palmer West Sports Council, Dr. Reiner focused her studies on sports injuries and rehabilitation.  She is also a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) by the National Strength and Conditioning Association.

She spent five years as the official chiropractor for the University of California San Diego, providing care to a variety of sports including swimming, soccer, volleyball, track and field, tennis, and basketball.  Dr. Reiner is certified in Graston Technique as well as Active Release Technique (ART).  She also holds certifications in FMS (Functional Movement Screen), SFMA (Selective Functional Movement Assessment), TRX suspension training, and K-laser therapy.

Top Stretches Done In Your Office

If you are like most of the population, you spend the majority of your time sitting. Either sitting at work in front of a computer, sitting for dinner, or sitting and hanging out with friends. I’m here to say that sitting is horrible! Here are some top exercises you should be doing to help relieve some of the common issues associated with poor posture and prolonged sitting.

 

About Doug
Doug currently works at Fitness Quest 10 as a personal trainer, strength coach, and Operations Director for Todd Durkin Enterprises (TDE). He is also the strength coach for Alliance MMA in Chula Vista, CA. He earned a B.S. in Exercise Science with a minor in Business Management from Westfield State University and completed some graduate work in Biomechanics at SDSU. Certifications and specialties include the ACE Personal Trainer Certification, NSCA-CSCS Certification, TRX instructor training, EFI Gravity instructor training, LIFT Sandbag Certification, Spinning certification, FMS training, and CPR/AED instructor status. He has appeared in multiple fitness videos, manuals and magazines; produced his own 2-DVD Set on strength & conditioning for combat athletes, completed a MMA Conditioning Coach certification program, and has competed in multiple grappling tournaments.

5 Moves MMA Athletes Should Be Doing

I really enjoy developing programs and circuits for my clients and athletes. Over the years, I’ve incorporated every tool you can imagine – dumbbells, barbells, tires, sleds, prowler, TRX, Ultimate Sandbags, Kamagon Ball, Home Depot hardware section creations, and many more.

The more experience and knowledge I acquire, the more I am starting to conform to the “less is more” theory. While I love experimenting and trying knew methods and tools, when it comes to the movements specifically; there are some essential exercises that I will always incorporate into my fighter programs. The variations will change up a bit depending on where we are at in the program, but you will always find them in there.

This is not an exclusive list. I took some liberties with the article and made my choices broad terms. I did pick one of my favorite exercises for each movement I selected though.

Here are my current ‘top 5’.

1. Hip Dominant

My choice: Kettlebell Swing

For lower body training, it is crucial to include hip dominant strength work. The hips are one of the most important areas of the body to train. I love training hip extension with sandbag cleans, tire flips, barbell deadlifts, and kettlebell swings. I realize these exercises will focus on a different fitness component; deadlifts for strength, cleans for power, and bell swings for power endurance. For this reason, I include them all into a full program. Since “power endurance” is critical for MMA, I really like the swing for this category.

2.  Upper Body Push

My choice: Pushups With Sit-Through

I love bodyweight exercises and pushups have been a staple bodyweight exercise for years. When done properly, pushups force you to really engage the entire body. This variation below will add an additional challenge to the shoulder joint, your obliques, and your hip mobility. Keep the entire body “stiff” and engaged throughout the movement to protect your lower back and shoulders.

3. Upper Body Pull

My choice: TRX Rows

When it comes to upper body strength training, I love pulling movements. There is too much focus on the pushing movements and the anterior chain of the body. This is true for every population, from our “desk jockeys” to our professional athletes. We need to incorporate more pulling exercises to help with posture, grip, and backside strength. Some of my favorite tools include dumbbells, barbells, kettlebells, heavy ropes, and the TRX. TRX rows are great because there is a quick learning curve for first timers and there are plenty of variations for all levels. I like to have my athletes perform their rows from directly underneath the anchor point with their hips extended to incorporate the lower body as well.

4. Torso Rotations

My choice: Superband Torso Rotations

While I am not a huge proponent of mimicking the exact movements of your sport in strength training, especially with heavy loads, I do see the obvious value in working those same muscle groups to have them strong, powerful, and more injury resistant. Torso rotation exercises have great carry over to the sport of MMA. I’ve used tubing, slosh pipes, Kamagon Balls, medicine balls, and superbands for these movements. I like using the superbands because you can really encourage the hip movement with proper band placement. I want the movement to involve the whole body, from feet to fingertips. To do this, I have the superband coming across the ASIS, which will almost force the lower body recruitment for proper technique.

5. Sprint Work

My choice: Hill sprints

These definitely fall into the “love/hate relationship” category. They don’t take very long to complete but they should still push you to your physical and mental limit. Treadmill, stairs, track, beach, resisted, hills…there is an endless list and some are more effective than others; especially from a biomechanical standpoint. I prefer hill sprints, especially on a softer surface like grass if possible. MMA athletes endure enough pounding throughout the week from all the sparring and joint locks. If we can incorporate conditioning sessions that are “joint friendly”, their body will thank us.

Final Thoughts

If you look at these five movements, we really get an entire body workout; a couple with an upper body focus, a couple with a lower body focus, and they will all increase the heart rate, which is the most important muscle we have. This could have easily been a “Top 20” list as there are so many effective movements out there. I feel this list includes exercises that will give you the most “bang for your buck”. If you want to get stronger, more powerful, and have more “gas in the tank”, integrate these variations into your strength and conditioning program today.

About Doug
Doug currently works at Fitness Quest 10 as a personal trainer, strength coach, and Operations Director for Todd Durkin Enterprises (TDE). He is also the strength coach for Alliance MMA in Chula Vista, CA. He earned a B.S. in Exercise Science with a minor in Business Management from Westfield State University and completed some graduate work in Biomechanics at SDSU. Certifications and specialties include the ACE Personal Trainer Certification, NSCA-CSCS Certification, TRX instructor training, EFI Gravity instructor training, LIFT Sandbag Certification, Spinning certification, FMS training, and CPR/AED instructor status. He has appeared in multiple fitness videos, manuals and magazines; produced his own 2-DVD Set on strength & conditioning for combat athletes, completed a MMA Conditioning Coach certification program, and has competed in multiple grappling tournaments.

For more information please visit www.dbstrength.com.

What I Learned At Fitness Quest 10

I recently completed my summer internship at Fitness Quest 10, and was asked to summarize my experience there. I could write a book about everything I did and learned this summer so instead I chose to write my top six moments:

6- I have to start it off with coaching and spotting the NFL players. I saw first-hand how hard these elite athletes have to train to be where they are. It was definitely memorable.

5- Training other coaches and trainers at IDEA inLos Angeleswas really exciting. I was in charge of the agility ladder and later in the day the battle ropes.  I had to coach up to at least 50 trainers on how to perform the set drills. Keeping up the excitement and yelling for an hour was not as easy as I thought but I got through it and all-in-all was a success.

4- Coaching the summer camps was great but the best part was just socializing and learning more about the kids from the Quest 10 Kids camp to the Elite college aged camp. The kids came every day with a smile (sometimes tired but with a smile) and were ready to work. They were there every day to get better, and our staff reassured them to keep working hard.  There was even a moment when the interns and campers got into some intense boot camp football games. Even Kyle (Director of Marketing) got out of his office and showed some of his football skills.

3- I could have put this group with the summer camps above but since it was an offsite camp I felt they deserved its own number. TheScrippsRanchHigh Schoolfootball team was a great coaching experience. Coach James and Matt led the workouts accordingly but I was there for three weeks coaching aside them. The most important key I learned from coaching there was how to communicate with a team of large numbers. At times the older kids would get out of hand but in the end they all trained extremely hard. As a collective group they were probably the most athletic camp so far which gave the coaches the opportunity to really push them to train harder.

2- The coaches and faculty at FQ10 was amazing. From the beginning they were helpful and welcoming. The culture there is more like working with your family rather than co-workers. All the coaches are experienced in their field so whenever I had a question they were quick to answer it. Coach Brett was extremely helpful and was always a great resource to go to. We spent more time with Coach Jeff then anyone else. We coached both Quest 10 Kids and Varsity Speed camps with Coach Jeff. I personally learned a lot from him, from how he would set up his warm up, how he designs his circuits, and the proper warm up. He mixed up the warm-ups in every camp so I was exposed to a lot of drills and fun exercises. I could write all day about everything I learned from each coach so I’ll just end it here. Thanks Coaches!

1- Finally, my friends that I came to know over the summer. There are six of us so we came up with a fitting title as the “Super Six.”  Big shout out to Big Tone, LP, Sean, Kelsey and CD! I want to thank all of them. I really learned the most from them because I would see them from 8:00 in the morning to sometimes 7:00 at night. We were our best critics and still worked really well together.  Last week we finished our summer together with a dance that Jeff asked us to do. Everyone should check it out on YouTube, I guarantee you’ll love it. This was the best summer ever and I wish the Super Six the best of Luck!  Oh and like Big Tone says “Get Big or Die Tryin.”

Best,

Adrian Vera

The Wonders Of Pilates

Ahhh, the Glorious Gluteus Medius! Such an important yet overlooked and forgotten muscle. The poor little chap is usually lost in the spotlight to its larger sibling Gluteus Maximus :(.  If we just paid this muscle a little bit more attention and gave it a little more TLC, we could not only avoid possible injury to the low back, but also to the knee, ankle and even the shoulder! We could also experience much more strength and fluidity in movement and become much more dynamic and efficient in sports and life in general. Bold statement I know, but I am standing by it.

In my opinion the Gluteus Medius is the most important muscle in the lower body.  The reason that it is so important is because it is one of the main muscles that control rotational forces throughout the hip.  The Glute’s are very important muscles that become weak, and the Gluteus Medius is probably the number one culprit. So many injuries are caused by a lack of controlled rotation and force in the hip/leg.

Why is correct rotation of the hip so important you ask? Well, if you take a look at the lower body you will find that the hip is the main part that wants to and should rotate. The lower back does not like rotation nor does the knee or ankle. In fact if you look at common knee or back injuries allot of them are caused by forced rotation of the lower back, knee or ankle. The muscle that controls that rotation is the Gluteus Medius and some of the other smaller deep hip rotators.

When athletes have a complaint about their lateral knee pain, more then likely this is caused by a tight IT Band (Iliotibial Band). If you have ever used a Foam Roller on the side of your leg then I am certain that you are more then aware of how tight and problematic the IT Band can be. Well, the IT Band is the muscle (or fascia actually) that comes to the rescue of the weak Gluteus Medius. What the IT Band is trying to do is to control the motion of the leg, which is far better and more efficiently done by the Gluteus Medius.

How do shoulder injuries have anything to do with the correct function and power of the Gluteus Medius you ask? Well, if you look at many sports that have anything to do with hitting or throwing a ball (Baseball, Tennis, Football), over 50% of the balls speed should come from the trunk, the back, hips and legs. Let me say that again OVER 50%! This means that before the shoulder gets involved in the throw or hit of the ball, the body from the shoulder girdle down should generate over 50% of the power that gives the ball its speed and force! If your Gluteus Medius is not working to do this then the result can not only be a less powerful movement (pitch, throw or hit). Make since??

If the Gluteus Medius does its job then the shoulder, knee, ankle, back and the WORLD are a much better place!

How can Pilates help?

Pilates will teach and help to create new muscle memory and patterns. Your brain holds onto incorrect muscle patterns that are developed through improper movement and or over use. It is important to teach the Gluteus Medius to get to work and to stop being so lazy. This is done first and foremost by working with its current range of motion and firing capabilities and being able to distinguish and tell when you are using other muscles incorrectly to compensate.

We have allot of fun tricks and methods in the Pilates room at Fitness Quest 10 to help you awaken that Gluteus Medius and turn it into that powerful and functional Hip Rotator that it was born to be!  Hope to see you in there soon!

-Stephanie Scarbrough
Certified Pilates Instructor & Massage Therapist

Stephanie Scarbrough was born and raised in sunny Southern California. She is a Certified Pilates Instructor and Massage Therapist.  Stephanie moved to Salt Lake City Utah after high school to attend the 1,000 hour Massage Therapy Certification Program at U.C.M.T. After graduation Stephanie moved back to California where she continued her nine year massage career mostly in Chiropractic offices focusing on Injury, Deep Tissue and Sports Massage, but has also worked in Spa’s, Private Practice and was an Instructor of Massage Therapy at Concorde Career College in San Bernardino, California.  She discovered Pilates as a form of rehabilitation for her injuries and feel in love with it. Stephanie then attended The Sheppard Method 450 hour Pilates Certification program in Los Angeles California. She is certified in Pilates Mat, Reformer, Cadillac, Wunda Chair and Latter Barrel.